Recipe: Shiitake Mushroom Omelette

I love omelettes. They are so versatile: you can put practically anything in them, you can eat them any time of the day, and they are pretty easy to make. This recipe calls for a stronger cheese like blue cheese. I surprised Jeremy this morning with a demand to make this for breakfast so I could take pictures of it – and all we had on hand was Swiss cheese. It was still a very tasty breakfast.

 

Shiitake Mushroom Omelette

Serves 1 or 2
3 ounces shiitake or other mushrooms
3 Tbsp unsalted butter
2 eggs
1 Tbsp heavy cream
2 tsp chives, rosemary, or other herbs
1/4 cup blue cheese, or other strong cheese
1/3 cup fresh greens such as arugula or chard, chopped.

Trim stems from mushrooms and save for soup stock. Heat 2 Tbsp of butter on medium low heat. Chop mushroom caps and saute for five minutes, or until soft and slightly browned. If mushroom look dry, add more butter to the pan. Set aside.

Add cream and chopped herbs to eggs and blend. Heat omelette pan on low heat and add 1 to 1 1/2 Tbsp butter. When the pan is hot, pour egg mixture into the pan so that the mixture extends to the edges of the pan. Top with crumbles of cheese, and add mushrooms and fresh greens to one half.

When the egg is cooked through, fold omelette in half and serve. Garnish with more herbs if you like. Serve with a green salad or slaw of kale, cabbage, and grated carrot. Enjoy!

Recipe: Beef Burger with Shiitake

Beef Burger with Shiitake

Serves 4
4 oz. fresh shiitake mushrooms, sliced
2 Tbsp butter or olive oil
3/4 to 1 pound ground beef
1/4 to 1/2 cup blue cheese
1/4 to 1/2 cup onion
1/4 tsp fish sauce
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
a little salt and pepper
4 hamburger buns
1 to 3 oz. salad mix, sprouts or shoots

Remove stems from mushrooms and save for soup stock in the freezer. Slice mushroom caps. Heat skillet or pan and add 2 Tbsp butter or olive oil, then add mushrooms when fat is hot. Saute until soft and slightly browned, about 5 minutes. Set aside and cover.  You can also saute the onions, separately, or use them raw – depending on your preference.

Prepare grill for burgers and buns. Blend cold ground meat with chopped onion, crumbled cheese, fish sauce, Worcestershire sauce, and salt and pepper; then form into thick patties and place on hot grill. Flip patty once and grill on remaining side until done. You can also sear on cast iron skillet at medium-high heat. Remove burgers to platter and cover until ready to serve. While burgers are cooking, brush bun faces with butter or oil and grill or sear briefly, then set aside.

Place burgers on grilled buns, then top with sautéed mushrooms and salad mix, sprouts or shoots. Serve open face or top with remaining bun. Enjoy!

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Okay, our burgers never look perfect (all round like they were cut out by a giant cookie cutter), but they are fabulously tasty!

Recipe: Delicata squash and Mushroom butter

Okay, I can’t help myself: this is more of a “recipe” than a recipe. I had to use the quota marks! That’s because this is more of a serving suggestion than an actual recipe. I’m going to do my best to make this look and feel like an actual recipe, but it’s hard to do that when there are only a couple ingredients involved.

The first ingredient is delicata squash. Delicata is a kind of winter squash and it is absolutely amazing. They are relatively small and easy to work with and taste great. They’re in stores and farmers markets now, so make sure to pick some up soon if you’ve never tried one.

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The second ingredient is our very own mushroom butter. If you’re near the Twin Cities you can find our mushroom butters (and spreads!) either at the farmers market or at The Wedge Co-op. I chose our smoked shiitake butter for this. Jeremy starts with our shiitake and smokes them in a smoker. Then he cooks those up with shallots and herbs, adds butter and mixes it all up creating a fabulous smokey, mushroomy, herby butter.

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That’s pretty much it. So here is an official looking “recipe.” This dish is a great side to add to the rest of your dinner.

Delicata Squash and CTHM Mushroom Butter

Delicata squash (however many you need for your meal)
Jar of CTHM Smoked Shiitake Mushroom Butter
a little butter or olive oil

  1. Clean the squash in case there is any dirt still on it. Slice the squash in half and scrape out the seeds and guts. You can compost the insides, feed them to your chickens, or save the seeds and toast them just like pumpkin seeds.
  2. Spread a little bit of butter or olive oil on the squash. This just helps it not dry out while cooking and adds to the tasty flavor. Place the halves on a baking sheet.
  3. Bake in the oven at 350 degrees for 40 minutes. After 40 minutes check to see if the squash is done. It will be quite soft and creamy when done. If they aren’t done, check every 10 minutes or so until they’re done.
  4. Scoop a dollop of Mushroom Butter into the hot squash and enjoy!

Recipe: Mushroom Ragout over Creamy Polenta

Serves 4-6
1 lb. shiitake and/or oyster mushrooms – cleaned, stemmed & either chopped, sliced, or quartered (however you prefer)
1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
7 Tbsp. unsalted butter
1/2 cup diced onion
1/2 Tbsp. minced garlic
1 tsp. chopped fresh thyme leaves
1 tsp. chopped fresh oregano leaves
3/4 cup diced tomatoes
1/2 Tbsp. tomato paste – optional
2 – 3  cups mushroom, vegetable, or chicken stock
1-1/2 tsp. kosher salt
1/4 tsp. freshly ground pepper
1/2 Tbsp. chopped fresh parsley
2 cups of whole milk
a pinch of ground mace
7/8 cup stone-ground polenta or course cornmeal
1/4 cup mascarpone or cream cheese
1/2 cup plus extra for garnish parmesan or Friesago cheese
1 Tbsp. chives

The Mushroom Ragout
Place a 12-inch skillet over medium-high heat, and add the olive oil and 2 Tbsp of butter. When the butter begins to foam, add the diced onion and sauté until translucent, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds.  Add the mushrooms and another 3 tablespoons of butter and cook, stirring often, until they have released most of their liquid, about 10 minutes.

Add the thyme, oregano, diced tomatoes, tomato paste if desired, and 1 cup of stock. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, until the liquid has reduced and the ragout has thickened, about 20 minutes. You can add another 1/4 cup or so of stock if the ragout seems to need it. Season with the salt and pepper, and stir in the parsley.

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The Creamy Polenta
Combine the 2 cups milk, 1 cup stock, 2 tablespoons butter, remaining salt, remaining pepper, and mace in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil on high heat. Whisk in the polenta and stir continuously until the mixture begins to thicken. Then reduce the heat to medium-low and cook, stirring frequently, for 30 minutes, or until the polenta is creamy and tender and starts to pull away from the sides of the pan. You can add up to another 1/2 cup of stock if the polenta seems to need more cooking and doesn’t feel creamy enough yet. When it’s cooked to the consistency you like, add the cheeses and stir to blend. Remove from the heat and stir for 3 minutes to cool the polenta.

Divide the Creamy Polenta among four to six shallow bowls, and top with mushroom ragout. Garnish with the parmesan and chives, and serve hot.

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adapted from Emeril Lagasse’s “Farm to Fork.”

Recipe: Mushroom Quiche

Quiche is one of my go to recipes. It takes a bit of prep work but it’s not too complicated and you can eat it for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. And brunch. At least, I do!

Our recipe is based on a quiche lorraine recipe from an old, falling apart copy of The New York Times cookbook. The original called for bacon also and I decided to throw some in because, hey, we have a TON of pork! This recipe will work pretty well in your standard store-bought frozen pie crust. If you have time to make your own pie crust and have a relatively deep pie plate, you probably will want an extra egg and another 1/2 cup of cream/milk.  Don’t worry if you end up with extra. I always end up with extra (depends on how many ingredients you pack into the crust) so I butter a small ramekin dish and toss in any leftover ingredients and egg mix for a crustless quiche. Yum!

Mushroom Quiche

Serves 6 to 8
3 to 6 oz. fresh oyster, nameko, or other mushrooms
or
1/2 oz. dried oyster, nameko, or other mushrooms
1 onion, thinly sliced or handful garlic tips, coarsely chopped
3 to 4 Tbsp. butter or olive oil
3/4 cup friesago or swiss cheese, cubed
3 eggs, lightly beaten
1-1/2 cups milk or heavy cream
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
1/4 tsp. paprika
1/8 tsp. fish sauce (optional)

If using dried mushrooms, cover in hot water with a weight on top to keep them submerged. Soak for at least a half hour, then remove stems and chop caps to desired size. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F. Line 8-inch pie plate with pastry and bake five minutes when oven gets up to temperature. After 5 minutes, pull the pastry crust out and set aside till you’re ready for it. It will probably have bubbled up (unless you used pie weights), but the bubbles will recede.

For fresh mushrooms, clean them if necessary. Remove the stems and save for soup stock. Heat 1 or 2 Tbsp. of butter or oil on medium heat. Chop or slice mushroom caps and sauté until soft and slightly browned, or about five minutes. If mushrooms look dry add more fat to the pan. Set mushrooms aside. Cook onion in remaining fat until onion is transparent. Spread onion, mushrooms, and cheese over the inside of the partly baked pastry.

Combine the eggs, milk, and seasoning and whisk until frothy. Add to the pie plate. Bake the pie fifteen minutes, then reduce the oven temperature to 350 degrees F. and bake until a knife inserted one inch from the pastry edge comes out clean – at least 10 minutes. You can also cook it longer till the egg is puffed up and nicely brown if you like it that way better, but you know it’s done when the knife comes out clean.

 

adapted from The New York Times Cookbook, edited by Craig Claiborne

Recipe: Prairie Mushroom Risotto

Just to warn you, this recipe uses a lot of pots and pans! If you’ve only got a few pots/pans you can probably tip cooked items into bowls to wait while you move onto further steps. This recipe is a little bit complex but it is so worth it. The arborio rice seemed a bit starchy toward the end, not as much flavor as I had hoped. I thought the dish was ruined, but then I added the butter and Parmesan, waited a couple minutes, and was blown away by the flavor. I will be eating this dish for breakfast, lunch, and dinner this weekend! It all comes together really well in the end and you will not be sorry you gave it a try.

Prairie Mushroom Risotto

Serves 4
2 oz. dried shiitake mushrooms or 10 oz. fresh shiitake mushrooms
1 1/2 oz. wild rice
about 3 to 4 cups stock or water
2 Tbsp olive oil
6 scallions or spring onions, finely chopped
1 large clove of garlic, finely chopped – optional
8 oz. arborio rice or other medium-grain rice
1 1/2 wine glasses of dry white wine
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 Tbsp butter
3 oz. grated Parmesan cheese
3 oz. crumbled friesago cheese

If you’re using dried mushrooms, soak them in water to cover for an hour, then pat dry with a towel. Set aside the soaking liquid. For fresh or rehydrated mushrooms, remove the stems and chop the caps. Heat 4 tsp oil on medium low. Saute the mushrooms until browned and slightly crispy. If mushrooms look dry add more oil to the pan. Set aside.

In a small saucepan, bring 1 cup water to a boil. Add the wild rice, cover the pan, and reduce the heat. Simmer for 25 minutes; drain well. (The rice doesn’t have to be done as it will be cooking more later.)

Put the stock (and mushroom soaking liquid if any) in a saucepan on low. In a separate pan heat the remaining oil, add the scallions or onions and garlic, and fry slowly for about 4 minutes. When the vegetables have softened, add the arborio rice and turn up the heat. The rice will begin to fry, so keep stirring it. After a minute it will look slightly translucent. Add the wild rice and wine and keep stirring.

Once the wine has cooked into the rice, add the mushrooms, and then add your first ladle of hot stock and a pinch of salt. Turn down the heat to a high simmer so the rice doesn’t cook too quickly on the outside. Keep adding ladlefuls of stock, stirring and almost massaging the creamy starch from the rice, allowing each ladleful to be absorbed before adding the next. This will take between 15 to 45 minutes depending on your preference; keep adding stock until the rice is soft but with a slight bite. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Remove from heat and add the butter and Parmesan. Stir gently. Place a lid on the pan and allow to sit for 2 to 3 minutes. Serve immediately with crumbled friesago.

 

recipe adapted from Jamie Oliver’s “The Naked Chef Takes Off”

Recipe: Oyster Mushroom and Braised Leek Soup

Serves 4 or 6

8 oz. fresh Oyster mushrooms
3 large onions or leeks – white part and 2 inches of the green
5 cups vegetable or chicken stock
2 sprigs rosemary or 2 Tbsp dried rosemary – held in a tea ball or cloth bag
1 or 2 cloves garlic, minced
4 Tbsp unsalted butter
salt and fresh ground black pepper
4 Tbsp olive oil
1 Tbsp chives chopped

Remove mushroom stems and chop mushrooms and set aside.

Chop onion or cut each leek in half lengthwise and place in a shallow pan with the stock and the rosemary. Cover and simmer over medium-low heat for 25 minutes, or until the leeks or onions are tender. Remove and discard the rosemary. Remove the leeks and chop into bite-sized pieces. Puree two-thirds of the leeks, all of the stock, and 3 tablespoons of the butter until smooth. Cook the soup in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat for 5 minutes, or until warm. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Keep warm. Reserve the remaining leeks for garnish.

Saute the garlic in 1 tablespoon of the butter in a medium sauté pan over medium heat for 3-4 minutes, or until translucent. Add the mushrooms and cook for 5-7 minutes, or until tender. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Ladle the soup into bowls and top with mushrooms and remaining leeks. Drizzle the olive oil over the top and sprinkle the chives around the bowls and top with freshly ground black pepper.

 

adapted from recipe by Charlie Trotter